Los Angeles, CA — The California Community Foundation (CCF) Board of Directors announced that Miguel A. Santana will be CCF’s next president and CEO. Santana currently serves as the president and CEO of the Weingart Foundation; he will assume his new role on October 16, 2023. Antonia Hernández will continue as president and CEO through October 13.

Santana was unanimously appointed by the Board after a rigorous interviewing and vetting process conducted by the Board’s Executive Search Committee, with the assistance of search firm Spencer Stuart. The search committee was impressed by the wealth of experience and diversity in the candidate pool. They selected Santana because of his deep commitment to addressing the challenges facing Los Angeles County; his demonstrated success in prioritizing the values of equity and inclusion; his passion for CCF’s areas of expertise, including advocacy, housing, immigration, charitable giving, and civic engagement among other areas; as well as his extensive leadership experience in philanthropy and the public sector.

“Antonia Hernández has built CCF to a position of great strength and incomparable reputation; Miguel Santana is the right leader to build from that extraordinary foundation to greater heights for the Foundation and for the Los Angeles region,” said Thomas A. Saenz, chair of the CCF board of directors. “His unmatched and lengthy leadership track record of successfully confronting myriad challenges in our dynamic region demonstrate that he will increase the positive impact of CCF on the Los Angeles that he has loved and served throughout his life.”

Santana began his career as a community liaison at MALDEF, before serving as former L.A. County Supervisor Gloria Molina’s chief of staff. He eventually became the city administrative officer for the City of Los Angeles, where he oversaw the City’s $9 billion budget and designed the City’s first comprehensive homeless strategy, resulting in a $1.2 billion voter-approved housing bond and a doubling of the City’s general fund investment on programs to end homelessness.

Santana was appointed president and CEO of the Weingart Foundation in 2021. Prior to joining the Weingart Foundation, he served as president and CEO of the Fairplex, a nonprofit community benefit organization based in Pomona.

“The California Community Foundation’s mission of fulfilling the promise of Los Angeles County aligns deeply with my core values of unapologetically fighting for equity, justice, and for a Los Angeles region where everyone thrives,” said Miguel A. Santana, CCF’s incoming president and CEO. “As a native Angeleno and the son of immigrants, it will be a privilege to work with the CCF team and the community on the tremendous legacy that my predecessor, colleague, and friend, Antonia Hernández has built. I know that together, we can deliver on the promise of Los Angeles.”

His commitment to creating a more equitable Southern California region is reflected in his leadership at the Weingart Foundation. The Foundation partners with communities across Southern California to advance racial, social, and economic justice. With $850 million in assets, the Foundation supports organizations focused on human services, housing, health, education, and community power building. Santana has been able to further the Foundation’s mission while centering community voices.

The Weingart Foundation has been one of CCF’s strongest philanthropic partners and allies. With Santana assuming his new role we expect our partnership to only strengthen.

“On behalf of the Weingart Board, we want to congratulate Miguel A. Santana on his appointment as president and CEO of CCF,” said Monica Lozano, chair, Weingart Foundation board of directors. “From immigrant inclusion to strengthening the capacity of LA’s nonprofits, we are proud to stand side by side with CCF in advancing our shared vision for a just and equitable Southern California. With Miguel’s appointment, we will continue our long-lasting partnership, working together for a better Los Angeles.”

“We at CCF are grateful to our colleagues at the Weingart Foundation for the ongoing working collaborations between our two powerful philanthropic organizations and view our choice of Miguel Santana as a mark of our shared commitment to grow that critical relationship,” said CCF board chair Saenz.

Santana’s numerous civic efforts include serving on the L.A. County Affordable Housing Solutions Agency (LACAHSA) board. He has also served on numerous nonprofit boards, including the Whittier College Board of Trustees. Santana holds a bachelor’s degree in Sociology and Latin American Studies from Whittier College and a Master in Public Administration from Harvard University.

Santana succeeds President and CEO Antonia Hernández, who announced that she was stepping down in March of 2023, after nearly two decades of leading and transforming CCF into a strong, vibrant advocate for Los Angeles County.

MEDIA CONTACT:

Paula Valle Castañon at pvalle [@] calfund [.] org or 213.452.6233

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The California Community Foundation (CCF) has served as a public, charitable organization for Los Angeles County since 1915. Its mission is to lead positive systemic change that strengthens Los Angeles communities. CCF stewards $2.3 billion in assets and manages 1,900 charitable foundations, funds and legacies. For more information, please visit www.calfund.org.

Los Angeles, CA — The California Community Foundation (CCF) released the following statement from President and CEO Antonia Hernández on the passing of former Los Angeles County Supervisor and Board Chair Gloria Molina:

“Los Angeles has lost a political pioneer, a champion for the underrepresented and a trailblazing Latina. The Honorable Gloria Molina dedicated her life to public service becoming the first Latina elected as California State Assemblymember, Los Angeles City Councilmember, and Los Angeles County Supervisor.

“Her legacy and impact in Los Angeles, the state and the nation will live on through the policy changes she secured and communities she served. Gloria joined the CCF Board of Directors as a board member in 2016, becoming the chair of the Board in 2021. As chair, Gloria sought to reimagine our resources to ensure that all Angelenos have access. Her unwavering commitment to strengthen communities throughout Los Angeles County will be felt for generations to come.

“Gloria opened doors for future leaders so that others would walk through those doors to impact and transform lives. Her keen intellect, passion, work ethic and strong sense of right made her a forceful advocate and a force of nature. As we celebrate the incredible life and career of Gloria, we can honor her by continuing to fight for equity in our vulnerable communities.

“CCF will always be incredibly grateful to the Honorable Gloria Molina for her service and commitment to our communities. We thank Gloria for her dedication and public service. Our hearts and thoughts are with her family, friends and colleagues at this difficult time.”

MEDIA CONTACT:

Paula Valle Castañon at pvalle [@] calfund [.] org or 213.452.6233

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*In lieu of flowers, Gloria’s family requests that donations be made to Casa 0101 and LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes in her memory to inspire and empower future generations through the arts.

The California Community Foundation (CCF) has served as a public, charitable organization for Los Angeles County since 1915. Its mission is to lead positive systemic change that strengthens Los Angeles communities. CCF stewards $2.3 billion in assets and manages 1,900 charitable foundations, funds and legacies. For more information, please visit www.calfund.org.

Los Angeles, CA — The California Community Foundation (CCF) Board of Directors, with gratitude to our longtime President and Chief Executive Officer Antonia Hernández, announces her plans to retire. After nearly two decades of leading and transforming CCF into a strong, vibrant advocate for Los Angeles, Hernández is ready to start a new journey.

“I have known Antonia for over half a century and have seen her professional journey starting as a civil rights lawyer, counsel to the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee, and leading MALDEF, the nation’s leading civil rights law firm for the Latino/a community,” said California Community Foundation Board Chair and former Los Angeles County Board of Supervisor Gloria Molina. “During her two decades at CCF she has transformed a small well respected community foundation into a leading civic philanthropic leader.”

Under Hernández’s inspirational leadership, CCF has expanded its impact with a philanthropic focus on education, health, housing and economic opportunity, immigration, civic engagement, and the arts for the residents of Los Angeles County. CCF’s assets, including donor-advised and other contributed funds, have grown nearly five-fold from $540 million when Hernández became president on February 17, 2004, to $2.3 billion today. During her tenure more than $3.4 billion has been granted to diverse non-profit organizations strengthening the fabric of society throughout Los Angeles, prompting national philanthropic recognition.

Earlier this year, Hernández led CCF’s move to its first permanent home in its 108-year history, a beautifully renovated 54,000 sq. building in the center of Los Angeles at 717 West Temple Street.

“Antonia has transformed CCF into the most influential philanthropic institution in Los Angeles County, and into an unmatched model for community foundations nationwide. Her legacy of extraordinary transformative leadership will make it difficult to find her successor; nonetheless, the Board is committed to ensuring that the next president and CEO will continue and build upon the critical role crafted by Antonia for the Foundation in and beyond Los Angeles County,” said Thomas A. Saenz, chair-elect of the California Community Foundation Board of Directors.

During Hernández’s tenure, CCF’s discretionary assets have grown significantly, allowing CCF to focus on changing the systems that create injustice and inequality in our community. Sheldon Stone, co-founder of Oaktree and former chair of the Board stated, “Antonia and I both joined CCF’s board 20 years ago. At that time, we were both newbies, and I had no idea that Antonia would ultimately be heading the organization. To say that she transformed CCF is an understatement. The organization grew dramatically under her watch, and its mission serving the most vulnerable in Los Angeles blossomed. The Foundation greatly benefited from Antonia’s tireless leadership, and just as importantly Los Angeles County had an advocate for those most in need. The organization she leaves behind clearly has her imprint, but, most importantly, it has the people and procedures to advance its mission of serving our community.”

Jane Pisano, the chair of the Board who led the hiring of Antonia, stated the following, “For two decades the California Community Foundation has grown to meet the needs of Los Angeles’ diverse community. Antonia Hernández’s sterling leadership and execution has been central to this work.”

Former Board Chair Reveta Bowers shared, “I had the honor to begin serving on the California Community Foundation Board the same year Antonia Hernández became its new president. I watched as Antonia embraced every opportunity and accepted the challenge of turning CCF’s Board, leadership team, staff and resources into one of the largest and most successful community foundations in the country. Under her able and impassioned direction, the Board and staff bring their expertise and dedication to improving the communities, organizations, and the lives of the individuals in those communities.”

Tom Unterman, former chair of the Board, commented, “Under Antonia, CCF has grown beyond philanthropy to be a leader in the effort to build a more just and fair Los Angeles. Antonia has also been an excellent steward of the Foundation’s resources, grown them beyond expectations and used them strategically to support policy initiatives that matter to all Angelenos.”

“I have been privileged to lead CCF for two decades. My entire career has been devoted to serving those in need. CCF has allowed me to work to improve the lives of all Angelenos. Together with our generous donors, contributors, and partners, we have been able to address issues affecting the most vulnerable persons in our society. I am proud to have expanded the role of a community foundation to be more than a grant maker but also a convener, advocate and change agent. The CCF staff and Board of Directors have built a strong foundation for the future of Los Angeles,” said Antonia Hernández, president and CEO of the California Community Foundation.

The Board of Directors has retained the firm of Spencer Stuart to assist them in leading the search for the next leader of CCF. Hernández will serve as president and CEO of the Foundation until her successor is identified and named, which is anticipated to take place later this year.

Hernández leaves a remarkable legacy. During her tenure she has transformed CCF into a 21st century activist community centered foundation.

Below are highlights of achievements during Hernández’s tenure as the president and CEO of CCF:

MEDIA CONTACT:

Paula Valle Castañon at pvalle [@] calfund [.] org or 213.452.6233

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The California Community Foundation (CCF) has served as a public, charitable organization for Los Angeles County since 1915. Its mission is to lead positive systemic change that strengthens Los Angeles communities. CCF stewards $2.3 billion in assets and manages 1,900 charitable foundations, funds and legacies. For more information, please visit www.calfund.org.

The Immigrants Are Essential Fund addresses high levels of burnout and financial challenges faced by the people that power the immigrant rights movement in Southern California.

Los Angeles, CA — The California Community Foundation (CCF) and the Weingart Foundation announce the launch of the Immigrants Are Essential Fund addressing the unique challenges faced by nonprofits in the immigrant rights sector in Southern California today. The fund was created in response to the findings of “From Burnout to Wellbeing Building a Sustainable Immigration Movement”, a report by CCF, Weingart, and The Raben Group, that found high levels of burnout, lack of mental health supports, and financial challenges amongst staff in the immigrant rights sector.

“Nonprofits in the immigration sector advance a powerful vision of justice and inclusion,” said Antonia Hernández, President and CEO of the California Community Foundation. “We know that to realize this vision, the sector and the people that power it, need to be healthy, strong, and adequately resourced. The Immigrants Are Essential Fund takes the necessary first steps to reimagine support for our community partners that is focused more on supporting the people who provide these critical programs and services.”

“Our immigrant rights partners have supported communities through tremendous challenges exacerbated by the pandemic and against the backdrop of anti-immigrant rhetoric and exclusionary policies,” said Miguel A. Santana, President and CEO of the Weingart Foundation. “We need to ensure that the health and wellbeing of the people within those organizations is prioritized. This is why we are proud to invest in the Immigrants Are Essential Fund and call on the philanthropic community to join us.”

While other reports have examined burnout within the nonprofit sector at large, the report revealed that organizations in the immigration sector are especially vulnerable as it is a sector that is chronically underfunded. Staff surveyed in the report largely feel they lack economic security with 53% of survey respondents stating that they do not have enough economic security to ensure lost work due to serious illness. Another 43% do not have adequate savings in the event of a financial emergency.

To address the alarming data in the report, the Immigrants Are Essential Fund promotes sustainability and wellness within the sector. Resources will be allocated to support wellness programs and activities such as self-care, therapy, workshops, and coaching for the people who power the sector in Los Angeles and surrounding counties.

An advisory committee comprised of movement justice leaders will provide strategic guidance on the fund’s grantmaking priorities. CCFand the Weingart Foundation each provided $250,000 in initial funding for a total of $500,000 and have a goal of raising $1 million during the initial phase of the fund. Funders interested in contributing to the fund can reach Rosie Arroyo, Senior Program Officer, Immigration for CCF at rarroyo [@] calfund [.] org.

MEDIA CONTACT:

Paula Valle Castañon at pvalle [@] calfund [.] org or 213.452.6233

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The California Community Foundation (CCF) has served as a public, charitable organization for Los Angeles County since 1915. Its mission is to lead positive systemic change that strengthens Los Angeles communities. CCF stewards $2.3 billion in assets and manages 1,870 charitable foundations, funds and legacies. For more information, please visit www.calfund.org.

Weingart Foundation is a private, nonprofit grantmaking foundation that partners with communities across Southern California to advance racial, social, and economic justice for all. Our vision is a dynamic and effective social change sector that is creating equitable systems and structures needed to achieve justice. Founded in 1951, the Foundation has to date granted over $1 billion to organizations, strengthening their efforts in human services, housing, health, education, and community power building. In addition, the Foundation builds networks and collaboratives with philanthropic, public sector, and community leaders to advance equity and justice together. For more information, please visit www.weingartfnd.org.

Report finds that internet is more expensive and slower in high poverty neighborhoods; while wealthier neighborhoods are being offered better pricing for high-speed internet.

Los Angeles, CA — The California Community Foundation (CCF) Digital Equity Initiative and Digital Equity LA have released a report today that sounds the alarm on disparities in pricing for internet service in LA County. The report documents the prices offered to residents of diverse neighborhoods across the County. Findings include that Charter Spectrum, the monopoly internet service provider (ISP) in LA County, offers better pricing for high-speed internet in wealthier neighborhoods. While high poverty communities are being charged higher prices for the same or inferior service.

“The findings of this report are concerning and raise significant red flags about the implications of those pricing disparities on the effectiveness of current public investments to close the digital divide,” said Antonia Hernández, president and CEO of the California Community Foundation. “Post-pandemic, equitable access to a high-speed and reliable internet connection at a price that is sustainably affordable remains a vital necessity for full participation in society.”

CCF and Digital Equity LA are calling on leaders in Los Angeles County, cities across the County, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), and the California legislature to investigate these pricing disparities and their implications for public investments in closing the digital divide.

“This report uplifts very sobering information we know all too well from our partners and network that students and families of color and those living in poverty across Los Angeles are facing disproportionate barriers to accessing quality and affordable internet,” Ana Teresa Dahan, managing director GPSN. “We call on our government leaders to hold internet service providers accountable for these grave inequities.”

Digital Equity LA and CCF Digital Equity Initiative documented advertised service options at a sample of 165 residential addresses across the County by shopping for service on ISP’s sales websites. The monopoly provider in much of LA County is Charter Communications, operating as Spectrum. According to Charter’s filings with the CPUC, it serves approximately 97% of households in the county. The next largest provider, Frontier, serves 21%. Therefore, most of the pricing data included in this report is for Charter Spectrum service.

Topline findings include:

“As a single parent to three boys who can only afford an inferior internet plan that is not fast or reliable, I am furious to find out about the lower rates that Spectrum is offering to wealthy neighborhoods,” said Yesenia Miranda Meza. “Like everyone else, I depend on internet access to do my everyday work and manage our lives. If I lived in a wealthy neighborhood, we would have a fast and reliable internet plan from Spectrum for less than half of what they offered me.”

She went on to share, “Internet has now become a necessity and multi-billion-dollar companies should not be allowed to continue to prey on us low-income, working-class people, who are simply trying to get by. This is an atrocity, and it should not be allowed.”

“So much of what enables people to thrive in society is now inextricably tethered to the internet – education, finding and applying for jobs, social connectivity, telehealth, and applying for programs such as Medi-Cal and CalFresh – all things we know are important drivers of health and wellbeing,” said Louise McCarthy, president & CEO, Community Clinic Association of Los Angeles County. “Universal access to fast and affordable internet is essential to health and wellness. We must hold ourselves accountable to the promises we made to ensure an equitable COVID recovery. This includes rectifying the inequities in access to the internet that were revealed so glaringly by the pandemic and ensuring all Angelenos can access high quality, high speed, affordable internet.”

To read the full report, Slower and More Expensive: Sounding the Alarm about Disparities in Advertised Pricing for Fast, Reliable Broadband click here.

MEDIA CONTACT:

Paula Valle Castañon at pvalle [@] calfund [.] org or 213.452.6233

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The California Community Foundation (CCF) has served as a public, charitable organization for Los Angeles County since 1915. Its mission is to lead positive systemic change that strengthens Los Angeles communities. CCF stewards $2.3 billion in assets and manages 1,900 charitable foundations, funds and legacies. For more information, please visit staging5.calfund.org.

CCF launched the Digital Equity Initiative in 2021 as a multi-year project to advance system change solutions to ensure equitable access to fast, reliable, and affordable broadband for every resident of Los Angeles County. More at staging5.calfund.org/digital-equity-initiative/.

About Digital Equity LA
Digital Equity LA is a coalition of more than 40 community-based-organizations working in Los Angeles’ communities delivering vital education, housing, immigration, health care, immigration and civic engagement services, supporting vulnerable communities in Los Angeles, and working together to advance digital equity as a necessary precondition to meet their core missions. The CCF Digital Equity Initiative provides financial and programmatic resources in support of Digital Equity LA. More at www.digitalequityla.org.

Los Angeles, CA — The California Community Foundation (CCF) has named 12 Los Angeles County artists as recipients of the CCF Fellowship for Visual Artists (FVA), totaling $480,000 in unrestricted grants. The announcement comes after a two-year hiatus due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. Fellows will each receive an unrestricted grant of $40,000, which is an investment in the artist’s career rather than a singular project. They also receive access to career development support and networking opportunities.

“If ever there was a time when we needed the arts to help us collectively heal after all we have endured, this is the time,” said Antonia Hernández, president and CEO of the California Community Foundation. “CCF is proud to support our Fellowship for Visual Artists fellows in their artistic careers and we celebrate their commitment to transforming communities through their work. Each of our fellows embody the future of arts in LA.”

FVA is one of the most prestigious arts fellowships in the region, which helps artists build successful, sustainable careers that support the thriving Los Angeles arts scene. The grants are often used to develop new work and fund exhibits, travel or general expenses. This year, 512 applications were received in a wide range of visual arts disciplines and reviewed by a panel of five distinguished artists and art professionals. The panel considered the artist’s entire career and future promise in the selection of this year’s fellows.

The 2022 FVA fellows are: April Banks (Interdisciplinary-Mixed Media); Nao Bustamante (Interdisciplinary-Mixed Media); Enrique Castrejon (Installation); Patty Chang (Interdisciplinary-Mixed Media); June Edmonds (Painting); Reanne Estrada (Interdisciplinary-Mixed Media); Asher Hartman (Installation and Experimental Film and Video); Iris Yirei Hu (Installation); Phung Huynh (Painting); Young Joon Kwak (Interdisciplinary-Mixed Media); Sandra Low (Painting); and Suné Woods (Experimental Film and Video).

“As a Southeast Asian refugee, artist, educator, community advocate and single parent, I persist in integrating the most significant aspects of my life,” said 2022 FVA fellow Phung Huynh. “I learn to situate my art in community spaces and look at narratives that are not fully represented. The greatest challenge is time and funding to support my work. The CCF Fellowship for Visual Artists will significantly impact what I do, deepen my artistic practice, and afford me the opportunity for community-based projects I have been dreaming to make. I appreciate how this fellowship demonstrates the need to value artists as essential cultural builders.”

FVA was officially launched in 1988 through a gift from the J. Paul Getty Trust to create a Fund for visual artists to recognize the outstanding talent of Los Angeles-based visual artists and arts organizations. Over the last 34 years, FVA has given more than $6 million in unrestricted funds to over 300 artists. Past recipients include distinguished artists, Carolina Caycedo, Beatriz Cortez, Rosten Woo, Mark Greenfield, and Andrea Bowers, among others.

“We need to help our artists thrive if Los Angeles wants to remain one of the world’s great creative cities,” says Joan Weinstein, director of the Getty Foundation. “Getty is grateful for the opportunity to have seeded FVA, which has nurtured so many outstanding, diverse artists who call Southern California home. We congratulate this year’s fellows, and we can’t wait to see their artistic visions continue to develop and grow.”

This effort has been supported through the continued generosity of the J. Paul Getty Trust Fund for the Visual Arts and sustaining contributions from, the Brody Arts Fund, the T.M. and R.W. Brown Fund, the Jennie Strong Memorial Fund, the Joan Palevsky Endowment for the Future of Los Angeles, the Rose Anne Rice Charitable Fund and other CCF funds.

MEDIA CONTACT:

Paula Valle Castañon at pvalle [@] calfund [.] org or 213.452.6233

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The California Community Foundation (CCF) has served as a public, charitable organization for Los Angeles County since 1915. Its mission is to lead positive systemic change that strengthens Los Angeles communities. CCF stewards $2.5 billion in assets and manages 1,800 charitable foundations, funds and legacies. For more information, please visit staging5.calfund.org.

For more information about the FVA fellows and to view their galleries please click here.

To find out how you can support FVA, please visit us here. One-hundred percent of contributions to the FVA go directly to artists.

Los Angeles, CA — The California Community Foundation (CCF) announced today its second transformative gift from author, advocate and philanthropist MacKenzie Scott in the form of two single-family residences located in Beverly Hills jointly valued at approximately $55 million dollars. This discretionary gift will allocate 90% of sale proceeds to the Foundation’s affordable housing grantmaking. The remaining funds will be allocated by CCF to support its immigrant integration program to advance opportunities for the millions of immigrants from throughout the world who call Los Angeles County home.

The cost of housing stands out as one of the most critical issues affecting the lives of millions of Los Angeles residents. A priority for Ms. Scott, the primary focus of the $55 million will be to permanently endow grantmaking efforts to benefit Angelenos in need of affordable housing. Since 2000, CCF has granted over $30 million to ensure Angelenos have safe and stable homes, together with the economic opportunities they need to thrive. CCF has also been an advocacy leader for increased affordable housing production, helping lead the passage of Proposition HHH, an initiative to add 10,000 new units in the City of Los Angeles by 2026. Los Angeles is poised to exceed its target by funding 10,510 units in 178 projects. Ms. Scott’s gift will permanently support the expansion of these grantmaking efforts.

“We applaud and are grateful to MacKenzie Scott’s extraordinary philanthropic investment in Los Angeles,” said CCF President & CEO Antonia Hernández. “Her singular commitment — here and across the country – to transformative philanthropy has already secured the long-term future of dozens of non-profits. With the California Community Foundation, her generosity will support organizations struggling to solve some of the most intractable issues facing our community. We are grateful for her partnership.”

Today’s gift follows an earlier, $20 million gift made to CCF in 2021 to establish the LA Arts Endowment Fund which will support diverse, small to mid-sized arts organizations that play a vital role in Los Angeles’ creative economy.

MEDIA CONTACT:

Paula Valle Castañon at pvalle [@] calfund [.] org or 213.452.6233

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The California Community Foundation (CCF) has served as a public, charitable organization for Los Angeles County since 1915. Its mission is to lead positive systemic change that strengthens Los Angeles communities. CCF stewards $2.5 billion in assets and manages 1,800 charitable foundations, funds and legacies. For more information, please visit staging5.calfund.org.

More than 136,000 students across LA County will be served through these programs, made possible in part by three gifts of $1M or more to CCF, most prominently $3.3M from Ballmer Group

Los Angeles, CA — The California Community Foundation (CCF) announced today the 108 summer and yearlong expanded learning programs that will receive more than $7.8 million in grants through the final installment of the LA County Summer Learning Initiative. The grants support learning and enrichment programs for low-income and vulnerable students in TK-12 schools and community-based organizations and will reach more than 136,000 students across Los Angeles County throughout next year, including almost 86,000 students over the next three months.

This unprecedented investment in summer offerings with expanded student learning opportunities extended into the upcoming 2022-23 school year is made possible through the generosity of several partner foundations and donors, including the transformative gifts of $3.3 million from Ballmer Group, $1.2 million from The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, and $1 million from the Murphy Family Fund. Other major contributors to the 2022 initiative are The Carl & Roberta Deutsch Foundation, as well as the Stone Family Fund.

“Ballmer Group is proud to support the California Community Foundation, for a second year as part of a community wide partnership to ensure that every student in Los Angeles will have access to quality summer programming,” said Nina Revoyr, Executive Director, Ballmer Group – Los Angeles. “We know that too often, access to summer and afterschool enrichment programs is dependent on family income. We also know that students who have access to high quality summer learning and activities see less learning loss, are more likely to stay engaged in school, get more access to mental health care, and have safe places to be – all hallmarks for long term success and economic mobility.”

Revoyr went on to say, “We are excited to have CCF and the unprecedented collaboration of the City, LAUSD, the County Office of Education, and the nonprofit community, all working together on behalf of our kids.”

Among the recipients of the 2022 LA County Summer Learning Initiative grants is the YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angeles who will run 45 summer camps throughout LA County, providing children throughout the county with academic support and learning recovery, plus expanded social emotional learning.

The group’s President & CEO, Victor Dominguez stated, “The YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angeles (LA Y) would like to thank the California Community Foundation (CCF) for their generous support. This summer, with the help of partners like the CCF, the LA Y will provide over 20,000 kids and teens with safe, high-quality sports, arts, fitness, civic engagement, and STEM summer enrichment activities that will help develop them into future leaders in their communities. Together, the LA Y and CCF are making summer enrichment possible.”

CCF first launched the LA County Summer Learning Initiative in 2020, in partnership with the LA County Office of Education, to address the physical closures of schools and community centers in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The disruption to traditional school operations exacerbated long-time gaps in educational opportunities and access along racial and socioeconomic lines for the County’s young people.

Despite the return to in-person learning in schools and programs throughout LA County, the need for responsive summertime learning environments and increased expanded learning during the regular school year to mitigate cumulative learning loss and address the social-emotional needs of youth still recovering from pandemic driven social-isolation continues.

“CCF and our partners have collectively given more than $16.6 million in funding support to schools and community-based organizations across LA county to ensure that students during summer and beyond had access to critical services in response to the pandemic,” said Antonia Hernández, President and CEO of the California Community Foundation. “We are proud of the impact we have had to more than 248,000 students over the last three years through the LA County Summer Learning Initiative.

Hernández went on to state, “As we embark on our final year of the Initiative, CCF will serve as a funding bridge to provide pandemic recovery support services to regional youth serving organizations, nonprofit academic and socio-emotional wellness programs, and recreational programs as well as partner with local school districts and charter schools.”

A grant to the philanthropic arm of the Los Angeles County Office of Education (LACOE) will increase staff capacity to provide critical support to approximately 30 local school districts to encourage, enhance, and manage partnerships with nonprofit and community-based organizations so they can effectively leverage federal covid recovery and state Expanded Learning Opportunity funds or program grants.

“We are thrilled to partner with the California Community Foundation to help districts build partnerships to expand learning and enrichment opportunities,” said Los Angeles County Superintendent of Schools Dr. Debra Duardo. “Los Angeles County has so many unique resources. With this support districts, educators and students will be able to take advantage of everything that our region has to offer. I am so grateful for CCF for their investment in public education this summer, and beyond.”

Additional partners working collectively to increase expanded learning opportunities across the LA region this summer and beyond include the Mayor’s Fund for Los Angeles, Great Public Schools Now, Expand LA, LA84 Foundation, Partnership for Children and Youth (PCY), Los Angeles Unified School District, and the Greater Los Angeles Education Foundation.

The full list of grantees can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT:

Paula Valle Castañon at pvalle [@] calfund [.] org or 213.452.6233

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The California Community Foundation (CCF) has served as a public, charitable organization for Los Angeles County since 1915. Its mission is to lead positive systemic change that strengthens Los Angeles communities. CCF stewards $2.5 billion in assets and manages 1,800 charitable foundations, funds and legacies. For more information, please visit staging5.calfund.org.

For more information about the LA County Summer Learning Initiative please visit https://staging5.calfund.org/la-county-summer-learning-initiative/.

Gloria Molina, former member of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, to serve as chair of the board for a two-year term

Los Angeles, CA — The California Community Foundation (CCF) today announced that the CCF board of directors have elected a new chair and two new members to serve on the organization’s 22-member board.

Gloria Molina a former member of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and the current chair-elect of CCF’s board of directors, will serve a two-year term as chair effective July 1, 2021. Molina succeeds Jim E. Berliner, president and chief investment officer of Westmount Asset Management, who has been serving as chair of the board since July 1, 2019. Berliner will remain on the full board of directors as chair emeritus.

In addition, Alfred Fraijo Jr., partner in the Real Estate, Land Use and Natural Resources Practice Group at Sheppard Mullin, and Dr. Darline P. Robles, Professor of Clinical Education at the USC Rossier School of Education, were elected to serve initial three-year terms on the CCF board of directors.

“I am humbled and honored that my colleagues have chosen me to lead CCF during such a historic time for our community and our organization. I am ready to do my part to help CCF continue its mission to strengthen Los Angeles communities,” stated California Community Foundation Chair and former Los Angeles County Board of Supervisor Gloria Molina. “I would like to thank my predecessor. We are extremely fortunate to have benefited from Jim Berliner’s leadership during this unprecedented time in our organization’s history. Under his tenure CCF was able to uphold its pledge to contribute to the health and well-being of all Angelenos during the COVID-19 pandemic crisis, as well as give resources to address the root causes of systemic issues and persistent barriers to create lasting changes in our communities. I look forward to continuing to work with him in his new role as chair emeritus and the new members of the CCF board.”

Louise Henry Bryson, chair emerita of the J. Paul Getty Trust, completed her service on the CCF board of directors as of June 30, 2021. Bryson served three, three-year terms after joining the board in July of 2012.

Molina stated, “We also extend our sincerest appreciation to Louise Henry Bryson for her unwavering commitment to furthering our organization’s mission through her years of service on the CCF board of directors. Her leadership and strong dedication to the organization and Los Angeles community have been extraordinarily valuable.”

Three members of the CCF board of directors were also re-elected to serve a second three-year term. These individuals include, Alejandra Campoverdi, Vice Chair, Golden State Opportunity; Elyssa Elbaz, Manager, Elbaz Family Foundation; and Daniel G. Weiss, Co-Founder and Managing Partner, Angeleno Group LLC. In addition, two members of the CCF board of directors were re-elected to serve a third and final three-year term: Gwen Baba, General Partner, Commercial and Residential Real Estate Investments; and Thomas A. Saenz, President and General Counsel, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

MEDIA CONTACT:

Paula Valle Castañon at pvalle [@] calfund [.] org or 213.452.6233

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The California Community Foundation (CCF) has served as a public, charitable organization for Los Angeles County since 1915. Its mission is to lead positive systemic change that strengthens Los Angeles communities. CCF stewards $2.4 billion in assets and manages 1,700 charitable foundations, funds and legacies. For more information, please visit staging5.calfund.org.

The grants which were made possible by a $1M gift from Facebook, will fund long-term infrastructure of Black-led and Black-empowering organizations throughout Los Angeles County

Los Angeles, CA — The California Community Foundation (CCF) announced today the inaugural cohort of 20 community-based organizations that will receive $1 million in grants through the Black Empowerment Fund. The grants, which were made possible by Facebook, will support organizations that work to strengthen the leadership pipeline, build wealth, change the media narrative, advance system reform, develop a conduit for research and intellectual advancement, and empower Black voices within the Black community.

CCF launched the Black Empowerment Fund in February 2021 to invest in the long-term infrastructure of Black-led and Black-empowering organizations throughout Los Angeles County. The 20 organizations that have been selected, in collaboration with the Black Equity Collective, represent dynamic leaders that develop transformational, community-centered solutions for the Black community, and create conditions for the Black community to achieve their full potential for self-actualization and social and economic prosperity.

“Facebook is supporting the Black Empowerment Fund to help counter the social and economic challenges faced by the Black community by dismantling systemic barriers to opportunity and expanding access to resources through online trainings and technical and financial support,” said Alex Bashian, Strategic Partnerships Manager for Facebook Los Angeles. “We hope these grants will increase access to jobs, workforce development, and career coaching to support economic growth in the local community.”

Among the recipients of the Black Empowerment Fund grants is Project Joy Inc., which works to empower, educate, and encourage the most vulnerable youth and families. This grant will directly impact youth, who will be able to participate in programs like Youth AI (artificial intelligence) Career Learning Program, which increases confidence, mental wellness, job readiness and career awareness. The funding and training will also enable them to grow their social enterprise, Project Joy Media, and offer digital marketing services to the hardest hit business owners in the community enabling them to tell their unique stories by providing critical media support.

“We are elated at the support and exposure that is offered by this grant,” said Kim Watson, Founder and Executive Director of Project Joy Inc. “The funding, training and increased visibility is a springboard; allowing us to create jobs, sustain life changing programs, increase joy and deepen our career services to the youth and families in our community.”

CCF has an established record of investing in the Black community to build greater community resiliency through programs like BLOOM, LASIF-YMOC, PAT, and Ready to Rise. This Fund is the next step in CCF’s evolution from resiliency support to long-term infrastructure investments, with the focus being on improving the social and economic outcomes to empower Black communities throughout Los Angeles County.

The Black Cooperative Investment Fund (BCIF), also among the Fund’s recipients, plans on using the grant to positively impact the Black community, by deploying low to no interest loans to Black-owned businesses. BCIF’s role in the ecosystem is to create jobs, build assets, improve chances for economic mobility in the community, and address the racial wealth gap.

“BCIF is laser focused on pooling dollars and raising awareness about the importance of economic empowerment, equity, and wealth building in the Black community,” said Robert Lewis, President and Board Chair of the Black Cooperative Investment Fund. “BCIF believes the Black community can get the change it seeks when it impacts the bottom line of corporations, politicians, and systems that take advantage of our ‘blind loyalty.’ As such, being an action-oriented partner within the ecosystem of efforts to close the racial wealth gap is paramount for BCIF.”

It is by resourcing and empowering our communities to address the root causes of systemic issues and persistent barriers, which will create lasting changes in our communities.

“CCF is committed to working with our leaders and community to invest and empower individuals and organizations that are developing responsive solutions to address the root causes of racism and disinvestment, which have disproportionately impacted Black communities,” said Antonia Hernández, President and CEO of the California Community Foundation. “We know that inequalities in education, health, civil rights and housing require investment in the capacity of people and communities in order to bring about real change, which is why we are thrilled to have partnered with Facebook and the Black Equity Collective to provide needed resources to our grantees.”

Queen, the Founder of the EarthLodge Center for Transformation, a Black-led spiritual sanctuary centering LGBTQI, women, youth, their families, and allies, stated: “This grant will allow us to expand our healing justice and trauma transformation work at a vital time as the world works to recover from the global pandemics of COVID and anti-Black violence. The rates of depression, isolation, violence and emotional distress, especially in the LGBTQI community, reached all-time highs since last March and the support of these funds will help us to continue to provide tools for healing, balance, wellness, community safe space and sanctuary to our marginalized communities…so that we can all experience a just recovery and healthier new world.”

The full list of grantees can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT:

Paula Valle Castañon at pvalle@calfund.org or 213.452.6233

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The California Community Foundation (CCF) has served as a public, charitable organization for Los Angeles County since 1915. Its mission is to lead positive systemic change that strengthens Los Angeles communities. CCF stewards $2.4 billion in assets and manages 1,700 charitable foundations, funds and legacies. For more information, please visit staging5.calfund.org.

For more information about the Black Empowerment Fund, please visit https://staging5.calfund.org/black-empowerment-fund/.